"The Men in the Wind" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 36x48"

"The Men in the Wind" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 36x48"

"The Men in the Wind" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 36x48"

Western Home Journal's review of "The Men in the Wind" by Zachary Proctor

Western Home Journal's review of "The Men in the Wind" by Zachary Proctor

Noted by artist Zachary Proctor as the "best painting I've ever done," the large-scale, breezy rendition of a landing helicopter on an aircraft carrier is a combination of seriousness and mirth. Reading it from left to right, the viewer has the sense of the movement of a camera à la Wes Anderson, with the mustached, carefree sailor having an almost relaxed conversation on a poignantly red telephone. This is in contrast to a comical vs daring pose by a non-uniformed man bracing himself against the tide of down draft. The 2:3 ratio of the canvas gives perhaps even more of a sensation that we are looking into a movie screen. While the motive is in question, the composition is not: a brilliant orange cone pivots the eye from front to right and triangularly to the helicopter. The motion is triumphant with the soft, fast brushstrokes adding to the feeling that the viewer, as well, feels open and alive.

Title: "The Men in the Wind" (2016, 36x48")

Artist: Zachary Proctor

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: 7250-9000

Provenance: Artist

"No Strings Attached" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Canvas 36x32"

"No Strings Attached" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Canvas 36x32")

"No Strings Attached" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Canvas 36x32")

In a perpetual theme of carnival-gone-awry, Lane Bennion has always juxtaposed the traditional theme of the carnival with its darker possibilities. Earlier works on Lane's carnivals were more obviously questioning the motives of theme parks, a la "Something Wicked This Way Comes," but in "No Strings Attached," Bennion gives us a sliver of sunsetting hope, and has not left us in total darkness as he has with previous works. The difference, of course, is the obvious lack of control, the removal of basic physical laws of designs: there are literally no cables attaching the cars of the ride. Are we in a futuristic theme park? Has Bennion wanted us to think in a new way? It is a carnival-scape on a new, grandiose scale. It is a challenge to rethink the basics of function. It is an affront to the mundane philosophy of entertainment, but as Bennion always remarks: "It will be what you make of it. It's your reality."

Title: "No Strings Attached" (2016, 36x32")

Artist: Lane Bennion

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: Upon Request

Provenance: Artist

"Spin" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Panel 16x18"

"Spin" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Panel 16x18"

"Spin" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Panel 16x18"

Lane Bennion's small works of 2016 have lonely, mesmerizing, thoughtful, descriptive, and indeed playful. "Spin" is the quintessential youthful activity: enjoying oneself, yet seemingly going nowhere at all. Being young and simply moving in circles, unaware of how the velocity of life will soon increase at an increasing rate, not because time will actually compress, but because there will be a different force at work. Something unmanageable and plodding. But for now the care is only concentrated on the avoidance of the nauseating disconnect between visual stability and cochlear swishings. Making sure that once your centripetal force is accelerating, you neither are thrown clear nor do you stop too suddenly. Adults, in the meantime, gaze into this scene, and perhaps realize both continue to happen without ever stepping foot onto a playground.

Title: "Spin" (2016, 16x18")

Artist: Lane Bennion

Medium: Oil on Panel

Estimated value: 1350-1550

Provenance: Artist

"Out of the Depths" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 11x14"

"Out of the Depths" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 11x14"

"Out of the Depths" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 11x14"

From his sweeping series of voyage-related paintings from 2014-2016, "Out of the Depths" captures the teamwork of rescue, an oceanic and tumultuous scene related closely to several other paintings of larger scale ("Pique"). Three souls grasp towards three souls, the equity of unfortunate circumstance, and the concern that the we, too, at any moment find ourselves on the salvatory side or on the hapless and forlorn side.  

Title: "Out of the Depths" (2016, 11x14")

Artist: Zachary Proctor

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: 1250-1450

Provenance: Artist

"CMYK" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Panel 16x18"

"CMYK" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Panel 16x18" (2017)

"CMYK" by Lane Bennion, Oil on Panel 16x18" (2017)

"It's one of those subjects that is interesting to "elevate" to fine art status, via oil paint.  I like to hear people's varied reaction to such a common, horrific, repulsive, and beautiful sight." Lane Bennion's non-linear subject matter had always toyed with the surreal, sprinkled into a daily routine that, for many, has become complacent. More recently, he has stretched the membranes of his immediate surroundings and has more forcefully presented the viewer with the challenge. "I've wanted to try a painting of roadkill ever since I saw a reproduction of the Odd Nerdrum painting "Amputation". In "CMYK," there is nowhere for the viewer to go. There is no pastural sunset to concentrate on while seeing only peripherally the "horrific" and the "repulsive." The viewer's gaze is downward--directly downward--not street-level as would be the sight from a fellow animal or rabbit or friend. We are left with a pitiful gaze, and certainly a helpless one. The daily scene on the streets and highways of the world is often one of complacency. How much time is required of us to make a proper gesture to the inhumane, yet accidental act? What do we do?

Title: "CMYK" (2017, 16x18")

Artist: Lane Bennion

Medium: Oil on Panel

Estimated value: 1350-1550

Provenance: Artist Studio

"The Venetian Glassblowers" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 36x48"

"The Venetian Glassblowers" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 36x48"

"We had just been to Italy and had experienced the craftsmanship of the work and the detail of the art. That, coupled with our visit to the painting in the Musee d'Orsay by Léon Lhermitte, that we saw on that same trip made for some inspiration to highlight and celebrate several timely crafts. There's been something in the common laborer that has been moving in me for some time. It's come out with this recent body of work "Grit" that's currently exhibiting in Park City, Utah." 

"The Venetian Glassblowers" has a centralized focus, a more modern technique, pulling the eye to the moment of the action, with the young apprentice looking on. The Old Masters' techniques of subtle transitions, enhanced by the deep, dark tones that Proctor uses in the edges softens the performance. The clutter of the workshop. The movement of the background workers. And especially the warm lights hanging in the dark. The concoction of expression and workmanship makes "The Venetian Glassworkers" an evolution of representational figurative painting. 

Title: "The Venetian Glassworkers" (2014, 36x48")

Artist: Zachary Proctor, 2014

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: 7250-9500

Provenance: Artist Studio

"Bind Up the Brokenhearted" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 48x48"

"Bind Up the Brokenhearted" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 48x48"

"Bind Up the Brokenhearted" by Zachary Proctor, Oil on Canvas 48x48"

Zachary Proctor's tilted and compositionally dynamic "Bind Up the Brokenhearted" from 2015 seems even the more relevant today. With a flair of Turner's oceanic grandeurs, the non-subtleties of people in turmoil, and the symbolic use of the American flag, Proctor noted: "This painting is a reflection on various themes, mostly though, I was thinking of what we can aspire to when we are at our best as a nation. As it says on the Statue of Liberty: 

"Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, temper-tossed to me,

I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

 

Title: "Bind Up the Brokenhearted" (2015, 48x48")

Artist: Zachary Proctor

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: 8500-10500

Provenance: Undisclosed Private Collection

Contact: joeladdamstao@gmail.com / 929.990.5113

 

"DOTS" by Erin Berrett, Oil on Panel 10x10"

"DOTS" by Erin Berrett, Oil on Panel 10x10" (2017).

"DOTS" by Erin Berrett, Oil on Panel 10x10" (2017).

The contemporary feel of Erin Berrett's still life painting has a remarkable approachability, and a focusing power when viewed from even a distance. Her paintings seem almost photographic from afar, and incredibly painterly up-close. The process of viewing her work is, in itself, both a personal study and a delight. Ms. Berrett is clearly a painter "of her time" as she delights in the bright colors of manufacturing, playful treats, toys, and objects of the life of "now." DOTS fulfills all the necessary attributes of her work: the patterned objects, the colors that represent the brightness of life, and the blocky chunks of shape, albeit subtle. However, we view "DOTS," most individuals would agree that it is the memory of sweet that overwhelms us, and which is captured so well by Erin Berrett.

Title: "DOTS" (2017, 10x10")

Artist: Erin Berrett

Medium: Oil on Panel

Estimated value: 950-1150

Provenance: Artist's Studio

"Macarons" by Erin Berrett, Oil on Panel 12x12"

"Macarons" by Erin Berrett, Oil on Panel 12x12"

"Macarons" by Erin Berrett, Oil on Panel 12x12"

If it's not Erin Berrett's rhythmic patterns, it's her subject matter. If it's not her subject matter, it's her color palette. Suspended in a tri-tonal color frame is yet another object of desire, just when you thought your own knowledge of interesting still life understanding was exhausted, her endless supply of imaginative and pleasing shapes redefines your interpretation of the visual world. Balanced and succulent in its composition, "Macarons" (feel free to investigate the French spelling) is indulgent without being obsessive, glamorous without being gaudy. Overall, delicious.

Title: "Macarons" (2017, 12x12")

Artist: Erin Berrett

Medium: Oil on Panel

Estimated value: 1050-1250

Provenance: Artist's Studio

"Honey Bear, #2" by Joel Addams, 11x14" Oil on Canvas

"Honey Bear, #2" by Joel Addams, 11x14" Oil on Canvas (2016)

"Honey Bear, #2" by Joel Addams, 11x14" Oil on Canvas (2016)

An 11x14" and a companion in a series, the honeybear has been a fairly well-known still-life subject in the repertoire of students and professionals alike. The warm sketch by Joel Addams came available in late December 2016.

Title: "Honey Bear #2" (2016, 11x14")

Artist: Joel Addams

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: 200 - 400

Provenance: Artist's Studio

Contact: joeladdamstao@gmail.com / 929.990.5113

"To Vy with Land and Sea" by Zachary Proctor, 11x14" Oil on Canvas

"To Vy with Land and Sea" by Zachary, 11x14" Oil on Canvas (2016)

"To Vy with Land and Sea" by Zachary, 11x14" Oil on Canvas (2016)

Zachary Proctor's hand becomes looser with each passing year, applying Picasso's well-known quote of taking years "to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child." Artists understand the laborious task of seeing the world in ways that others don't, that "unthinking" is a process of deconstruction that effectively reverses a lifelong process of being shown how to see, how to look. Many of these artists, film directors, photographers, poets (especially), are not drafting work for those who refuse to see the world in any other way than rigid. The beauty in Proctor's monochromatic, pounding depiction of a flight crew member is one fully of movement. It matters not if flight is beginning or ending: the strokes of minimal interpretation allow us to feel wind, the exhilaration of movement, the shorts burst of interaction over land and sea.

Title: "To Vy with Land and Sea" (2016, 11x14")

Artist: Zachary Proctor

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Estimated value: 800-1000

Provenance: Artist's Studio

Contact: joeladdamstao@gmail.com / 929.990.5113

"Gandhi" Portrait by CJ Hales, 8x8" Oil on Panel

"Gandhi" Portrait by CJ Hales, 8x8" Oil on Panel (2015)

Mahatma Gandhi embodies a principled life that has been rarely replicated, a life that drew from his legal experiences of fairness and justice, from his religion of birth, and interestingly, from his application of Judeo-Christian values, all superimposed on a country in flux and in strife. It's difficult to calculate his impact on humanity, and the commission to CJ Hales was taken with a seriousness of an artist who understood the gravity of such a representation. The familiar face is always the most difficult, and Mr. Hales scrutinized his own labor for months, despite the final painting being small. The outcome was well worth the time, as we are left with an almost monochromatic, ultimately calm gaze of a human who knew persecution and triumph, hatred and love. And this is what comes through in the portrait, a serenity of knowing something that is attained only at the highest costs.

Title: "Gandhi" (2015, 8x8")

Artist: CJ Hales

Medium: Oil on Panel

Estimated value: 400-600

Provenance: Joel Addams, Artist/Photographer

Contact: joeladdamstao@gmail.com / 929.990.5113